New Manufacturing Facility Using NanoMaterials Opens in Austria

The facility will print semiconductor-based optoelectronics.

Nanoident Technologies AG, a manufacturer of printed semiconductor-based optoelectronic sensors, announced March 13 it will open a plant in Linz, Austria.

"Just as we can't imagine our lives today without electronic devices that rely on silicon-based semiconductors, in the near future the same will apply to printed electronics-based applications," said Craig Cruickshank, principal analyst at cintelliq. "Nanoident's OFAB opening is a significant step forward to making the vision of printed electronics a reality with the first of what will be a growing number of printed electronics facilities worldwide."

Nanoident's OFAB is fitted with a class 100 cleanroom (less than 100 half-micrometer particles per cubic foot). To produce printed electronics at the OFAB, nanomaterials are deposited onto a substrate using advanced printing methods. The process is extremely fast. For example, traditional chip manufacturing takes approximately two to three months. In the OFAB, the entire process can be completed in hours or days, depending on the application. Prototypes and volume production can be run on the same equipment, which allows for highly customized devices. Production capacity can easily be scaled as needed by adding more equipment. Toxic materials are not used in the OFAB, making it a green production process.

"The OFAB opening marks a major industry achievement by bringing a new class of printed electronics from the lab to the fab," said Klaus G. Schroeter, CEO, Nanodient "Printed semiconductor-based optoelectronics devices created by the OFAB will usher in an era of new application types -- traditionally not well suited for silicon -- which will improve healthcare, enhance personal and homeland security, as well as drive new industrial applications. These applications are just the beginning, as we look forward to driving continued advancements for printed devices that will enhance peoples' lives."

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish