Intel Devotes Lab to Study Next Stage in Computer Technology

User experience will move away from mouse and keyboard, instead using touch, gesture and voice.

Intel, the manufacturer of computer chips and microprocessors, believes the way people use computers is changing faster than we understand. Computers, the company says, need to change with the times. As such, Intel is launching a research lab dedicated solely to developing more intuitive technologies.

According to Intel's Chief Technology Officer Justin Rattner, a new lab is being developed for interaction and experience research focused on creating a more seamless user experience, one that relies less on the mouse and keyboard and instead infuses touch, gesture and voice.

"Better technology isn't enough these days," said Rattner in a statement from Intel's annual Research Day in Mountain View, Calif. "What the individual values today is a deeply personal, information experience. When I look ahead, this is the biggest change in computing I see coming."

To facilitate this vision, which will be led by Intel Fellow Genevieve Bell, a team of researchers has been assembled, which includes interface technologists and social scientists, to develop what the company believes is the next stage of computer technology.

"Intel now touches more things in people's lives than just the PC," Bell said. "Intel chips and the Internet are now in televisions, set-tops, handhelds, automobiles, signage and more. [The new division] will build on 15 years of research into the ways in which people use, re-use and resist new information and communication technologies. Social science, design and human-computer interaction researchers will continue that mission, asking questions about what people will value, what will fit into their lives and what they love about the things they already have."

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