Programming Cobots More Accessible with Free Online Training Universal Robots

Programming Cobots More Accessible with Free Online Training

The online training modules provide the basic foundation for all UR robot training at Whirlpool’s plant in Ohio.

Learning how to set up and program a collaborative robot – or cobot – no longer depends on real life access to a robot or a training class, thanks to the new Universal Robots Academy.

The online training modules consist of six e-learning modules that make up the basic programming training for UR robots. This includes configuring end-effectors, connecting I/Os, creating basic programs in addition applying safety features to an application.  Training is available in English, Spanish, German, French and Chinese,

“This is a long-term investment for us,” explailned  Esben Østergaard, CTO of Universal Robots, which is part of Boston-based Teradyne Inc. “We want to raise the robot literacy and the reason for speeding up the entry of cobots is not only to optimize production here and now.”

“We are facing a looming skills gap in the manufacturing industry that we need to bridge by all means possible. “added Østergaard. “Facilitating knowledge creation and access to our robots is an important step in that direction.”

One of the early adopters of the Universal Robots Academy is Whirlpool Corp. The online training modules now provide the basic foundation for all UR robot training at the company’s plant in Ohio. 

“Now we don’t have to wait and send them out for basic training elsewhere, “said Tim Hossler, controls engineer at Whirlpool. “The modules can be completed at our own pace and we can even pick and choose which modules we offer different personnel depending on skill sets and their level of interaction with the robots.”

“I really like the interactive approach, it makes learning very hands-on and transferable to what we would actually be doing here at our plant, " said Hossler. 

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