Dell Will Open A New Mfg. Plant In Chennai, India

Dell's most comprehensive presence in the world outside the U.S will be in India.

Speaking the CII-CEOs Forum held in New Delhi on March 20, Michael Dell, CEO of Dell, said the company's plans for expansion in India include a manufacturing plant in Chennai. "With local manufacturing in place, Dell's most comprehensive presence in the world outside the U.S will be here in India -- domestic sales, research and development, manufacturing, customer support, services and analytics," he said

Dell cited India's economic growth rate of 9% per year along with the projected growth of people online to hit 2 billion over the next few years as factors for expanding in India.

India currently has about 50 million people online, which is less than 5% of the population, Dell pointed out. He also said Internet use in the country has increased 700% since the year 2000. More important, he said, is for companies such as Dell to help the second billion people worldwide, many from India, to get online so that they can participate and compete in the economy today -- and tomorrow.

"It is evident that the catalytic impact of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) and the extent of its adoption is a prime factor in the rapid development of the Indian economy in the recent past.Through enthusiastic exchange of ideas between leaders and decision makers, the CII-CEOs Forum has evolved into an effective platform that provides rich insights into key trends to generate new growth opportunities across all industries. It has been a great opportunity for CEOs from across the industry to have an interactive session with Mr. Dell," said General S S Mehta, director general of CII (The Confederation of Indian Industry). The CII's mission is to "create and sustain an environment conducive to the growth of industry in India, partnering industry and government alike through advisory and consultative processes."

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