IndustryWeek's 2009 Salary Survey Comments on Manufacturing's Biggest Challenge: The Economy

As part of the IndustryWeek 2009 Salary Survey, we asked the open-ended question: What is the biggest challenge facing the manufacturing industry today?

Following are more than 1,300 anonymous responses from IW readers, expressing exactly what concerns them the most about their jobs and their situations. (Comments have been lightly edited, mostly for clarity).

staying in business
The economy
reducing costs while maintaining high quality
lack of qualified personnel entering industry
Stable financial markets
Credit
the economy
survival
age
inefficiency
Labor costs
people
economic slowdown
work force
reducing costs without job elimination
The economy!
remaining competitive with foreign suppliers
increased pricing for materials
material cost fluctuation, energy cost
skilled labor with proper attitude
The global credit crunch
lack of orders
Recession
outsourcing
Finding & hiring qualified employees
large fluctuations in customer demand
Global Economy
overseas competition & economic fallout
economic downturn due to domestic tax structure
Create Opportunities to Keep Talents
lean strategies
ECONOMIC UNCERTAINTY
competition in general, finding skilled workforce
Economy's impact on consumers
being cost effective and producing quality product
government
Finding quality employees
steel prices
Decreasing Sales - Recession
The economy
Global Economic Crisis
Being profitable
Entrenched leaders with subversive tactical methods
Economy
Continued quality and utilization improvement and reducing over all lead time.
controlling costs
Change
Finding and keeping skilled workers
cost
Foreign Competition
Customer Service: PERFECT SHIPMENTS
FINDING GOOD PEOPLE AND MAKING A PROFIT.
Economic Conditions
EPA regulations
Quality control
Fears of recession
producing good parts at the right price
growth
Overall Economy
stability
foreign competition
economy
Loss of MFG jobs in the US, and lack of interest in MFG with college & HS grads
applying new technology
too much capacity
Economic slowdown
keeping manufacturing in the us.
skilled labor
Imports and available capital
Offshore competition from communist countries that are forcing a trade imbalance
Rising Material Costs
capital for our customers
Down turn in the economy -- Slowing sales
economy
getting folks to buy USA
The cost to produce compared with our overseas competitors.
negative media bias
Poor economy and Chinese competition
Foreign competition
workforce
Just staying in business during this horrific downturn
AUTOMATE WHEREVER POSSIBLE, ABSENTEEISM AND EMPLOYEES WHO DO NOT CARE ABOUT THEIR JOB ARE ERODING THE QUALITY OF OUR PRODUCTS AND AFFECTING PRODUCTIVITY.
reducing production costs
Government
labor force
downturn in the economy, rising fuel costs, rising energy costs, rising transportation costs
Convincing our leaders that manufacturing creates wealth.
Demand in the current economic climate
eliminating waste and cutting costs
The economy, slowing sales decreasing profits
Adopting a true Lean Manufacturing concept
resistance to change/risk aversion
Survival between outsourcing & the economy
money
productivity
keeping plants open in the U.S.
Quoting jobs & precision work
China, politicians, trained people
adapting to change in global environment
outsourcing
The Economy, OIL PRICES and There after effects
Economy
Chasing cheap labor
quality personnel
internet and 3 world company's
financial and environmental impacts of energy needs
Poor Political Climate for Manufacturing
foreign competition
Competition from other countries paying far less than our minimum wage.
us deficit and cheap foreign competition
surviving
skilled resources
Lowering Operating Costs
The economy
Pricing pressures and reduced demand
re-investment/upgrades into plant operations proper use of best available technologies or utter disregard in focus of profits (short term)
Quantifying true total cost
keeping costs down
low cost foreign producers and shift to China
ECONOMY
low cost competitors overseas
new administration
cost cutting competition and hourly skills
lead times & supplier shortages
Getting talented experienced people
Costs, raw material, energy, insurance
Taxes
Recession
Lack of commitment to keep mfg base in the USA
OUTSOURCING
Economic down turn
Adopting a Lean culture
Global recession
New Contracts and finding the good people
Dealing with the economic downturn
Competing Globally
Qualified people
The economy
Cost of energy
The global economy.
Lagging innovation
Hiring qualified personnel
Cut costs but improve quality
foreign competition
Hiring trainable and motivatable people
Attracting talented professionals
outsourcing
Trade agreements and foreign competition
market turmoil
Acceptance of Poor Quality
Economic decline combined w/ foreign competition
Orders
Raw material price increases
Finding food quality skilled workers
global market
not sufficient innovation because "on job" training concept. Too low educational level of the work force
Economic pressures from recession
Qualified Recruits
Over producing product
labor unions, government spending and mandates
Going Lean, Cost Reduction
GETTING GOOD YOUNGER EMPLOYEES TO TRAIN
Domestic Cost Reduction
Raw Materials Market Speculation
global competition and lack of capital reinvestment
Implementing continuous improvement strategy
outsourcing to foreign countries
Future of manufacturing in USA
Global Competition
Uneven trade policies
Competition from foreign companies with low labor costs and minimal environmental responsibility
outside competitors from other countries
FOREIGN COPY
Losing market share.
governmental policies
Unfair trade practices/barriers and offshoring
Outsourcing of jobs and work
Internal cost control
economic collapse
skilled labor
Being competitive worldwide
ECONOMY
outsourcing
Managing the down turn
meet quality standards
volume
Efficiency
inventory reduction
China Flight
Competition
skilled or qualified personnel
staying in business
Foreign Competition
Imports
keeping customers
Economy
Fair trade, tough domestic economy
Finding Qualified People who want to work
Raw Materials cost and declining sales
the economy
high raw material and increasing labor costs
labor
Lowering sales
foreign competition
Becoming lowest cost, highest quality producer in a world market.
Sales Growth
finding AND keeping good people
Cost containment
Just staying in business - revenues up and costs down
Finding qualified manufacturing employees.
supply chain
making a profit
staying profitable in a global economy
Quality workers
The economy and changes that are being made in order to bring margins, EBIT in where they need to be due to less sales.
The slow economy
Lack of talent
Finding work
Economy
Talent pool of new employees
Effective Leadership
Quality in the face of cost reduction
downsizing
offshore competition
economy
foreign competition
Sales
The economy
Getting Qualified personnel
Economy
Continuous Improvement
Stupid US trade policy
finding customers
people settling for inferior product
qualified workers
Becoming a Lean factory
Only one? The economy
An unfair global landscape -> Corporate bias towards exit USA
Qualified Mechanics
Being competitive
Uncertainty about both sales and supplies
Lack of sales
stability of order book
capital
No sales
Government Interference and mandates
Market Share and Up to date equipment design
Competing with the global market and keeping jobs here in the United States
Rising costs of materials and energy
reasonable capital investment resources
rising costs and diminishing vendor pool
Government taxes and regulation
Ensuring a continuing influx of new engineers
Being lean in all aspects of manufacturing
rebound of the economy and construction industries
global economy
economic conditions and china
cost controls
Sales
changing management and HR practices to achieve TPS like performance
GETTING FAKE PARTS
Convincing the public and politicians that manufacturing is the true wealth generator for the middle class and upper class. Everything else is just wealth gathering.
Government regulations
reducing cost
quality
Outsourcing
Labor costs compared to offshore
Economy
lack of margin
Economic instability
The economy
The Global Market and outsourcing
current economic and credit crunch climate
Economy
finding good people
economy
Economics
Low employee availability in younger generations
a decline in sales means a decline in manufacturing
budgets
Finding qualified people
Strong technical people
competing with off shore
maintaining trained staff
Finding highly motivated people willing to work hard for better than average pay
cheap labor competition
Competing with Off shore cost structures
weak economy
ECONOMY
labor
government
Drop in consumer demand
economy
business
GLOBAL ECONOMY / CHINA
Outsourcing to low cost countries
people wanting to do a good job everyday
Cost
the trade deficit
sales
Finances
Economy
to keep a manufacturing base in America
Shrinking Economy
finding capable personnel
general economics of the country
The Economy of the World and Credit Markets
China
STAYING COMPETITIVE IN A GLOBAL MARKET
Maintaining profits with rising costs
qualified employees
Material and Labor costs
out sourcing to foreign countries
Finding qualified workers
overcoming the push toward 'socialized' manufacturing
Parts sourcing
Continuous Improvement of products and processes.
globalization
low cost country outsourcing
raw material costs
The credit crunch and lack of demand.
planning and optimization
Economy
skilled workers
Loss to other countries: Labor/Medical Costs
Loss of domestic manufacturing to overseas plants
SKILLED EMPLOYEES
Current economic conditions
Personalities
Moving Manufacturing outside of the US.
coming defense spending cuts
Low profitability. And losing talent to higher paying fields.
imports
margins
Management Buy-in to change
Economic Downturn
Global competition
Growth
EPA
New contracts and customers
GOING LEANER AND LEANER TO BE COMPETITIVE
competing in the world market successfully
Quality workmanship.
off shore manufacturing
Lack of new housing starts
skilled workforce & labor costs
global competition
keeping cost down
cost
American mindset/global economy
Learning a new type of product/industry
skilled labor
economic uncertainty delaying needed decisions
Economy
Offshoring and outsourcing
Lazy workers
keeping talent in US operations
poor economy
economy
Qualified people
More order
US manufacturing decline and the global pressures
Competing globally
labors
Economy
Business Growth
Lack of social and moral integrity of employers and employees; In-equitable foreign competition; high cost, unionized labor
Wal-Mart
Reducing cost
demand
keeping jobs in the USA
global wages
process waste
overhead
attracting skilled employees
Government intervention
the automotive downturn
Metal Pricing
competition
Lack of faith in the economy
Training & Retention
Cost of manufacturing
Asian competition
The economy and spending
Investing in technology and IT to improve productivity and change the culture
quality control
profit margins
Recruiting & training good people
Overseas competition
learning lean ideas
us economy
China, India,
Competing with foreign manufacturers
The economic struggle
Government: Fair international playing field
making money
economy
Government regulations
Far Eastern Competition
economy
economy
cost control
Foreign companies
Quality People
bad economy
Where are the jobs?
efficiency
Job Layoffs
value added efficiency and quality
Finding top quality employees
the recession and economy
Retention of skilled employees
aging equipment
Help
foreign markets
Adapting to continuous change
recession
the economy
New business
China
COSTS
components made in Mexico and China
Economy
Economic and financial
profitability
man power
Overseas manufacturing
Lack of skilled labor & recently the economy
Training
Idiots in Congress and liberal who support them
skilled staffing
economy, loss of manufacturing overseas
Keeping operations in Massachusetts/U.S.A.
offshore industry
unfair trade policies
Imports & the economy
Rising costs and decreasing budgets.
recession
China
Energy and Government Regulation
UPDATING EQUIPMENT TO LATEST TECHNOLOGY
Erosion of jobs to overseas contractors
Regulations and fluctuating costs
U.S. losing its manufacturing base due outsourcing
economy, no buying product
off shore mfg.
Lack of construction
Overall Global Economic Conditions
Global competition
downsizing
Qualified employees
Finding qualified people
overseas competition
slow down in the market
supply and logistics
pricing of products
Finding and maintaining qualified people
IMPORTING PRODUCT THAT SHOULD BE BUILT IN US
Finding work form co. that are still in business.
cost control
Economy
Housing
The economy
Decrease in Manufacturing/Production
Global Economy
Holding costs down to produce at a competitive price.
quality/cost
Developing Leaders from Managers
Economic downturn
Performance Excellence
slow economy
Economy slow down
outsourcing
the cost of doing business in a slow housing market
short term vs. long term focus, leadership rewards
overseas competition
Failure of companies to utilize Lean Management (Toyota Production System)
Government interference; phony cafe standards & refusal to STOP unfair competition allowing Japanese & Chinese to sell to us without buying from us.
cost, sales
World economic crisis
Offshore competition
Economy
Economy
The credit crisis
profitability
The failing economy and Obama economics.
staying competitive
Controlling Costs
COST
Supply and over seas comp
economic meltdown
Unfair Offshore Competition
the credit crisis
loss of jobs in the US due to unionized workforce
Government Regulations
foreign costs/USA costs
Competing with foreign companies
economy
speculators, government, world crisis
keeping our customer base
cost of manufacturing
COSTS
qualified people
Loss of hourly input & importance
new willing people
Proper Inventory Levels, quality
aligning capabilities with customer requirements
A willing and able workforce
Remaining cost and quality competitive
Asian manufacturing
Offshore wage pressures
Economy situation
volume
QUALIFIED WORKERS
economy
Cost control
Leadership
experienced/skilled staff
Staying current with changes in technology
The manufacturing industry is plagued by an aging management population, most of which is male. Unfortunately, it is difficult for a woman to advance in an environment which promotes the "good old boy's club." For manufacturing to remain competitive in the United States, the current attitude of management needs to become more welcoming to the points of view of not only women, but younger managers as well.
Outsourcing to low-cost regions
shrinking market & leverage buyout management.
World Economy
More with less, becoming even leaner in today's business climate
declining economy
Automation
The poor economy
Lack of training programs and therefore skilled personnel.
offshore competitive and lack of resources
Consumer confidence
Current economic meltdown
costs
Employee retention & morale
Technology
COST OF RAW MATERIALS
Productivity, Customer Givebacks
cost
Quality sales people, being positive and helping customer grow their sales by being creative
ECONOMY
Customer Demands
Materials costs
slow growth - recession
Economy
Competition
Government reduction of weapons.
import competition
maintaining an ability to compete
winning bided work
The current economic slowdown and resulting uncertainty
Loss of technical skills
material costs
Economy
Maintaining Innovation, both process, quality and product
The economy and offshoring
Coherent domestic policy
Foreign competition reducing US manufacturing base.
The economy slowing sales
Globalization and tax structure
The economy
Global competition
Qualified workforce
extreme variation in global economics
economy
attracting, recruiting and retaining talent
Economy
cozy
outsourcing
low cost mfg teamed with quality controls
foreign companies doing it cheaper
Properly managing company resources through economic swings
safety and production
Slowing economy and product demand
cost cutting versus quality of deliverables
Qualified Employees
U.S. base
economic downturn
thanks to Republicans, a total lack of regulation and oversight in the financial market has led to manufacturing companies not being able to fund operations (our capital costs are up double digits)
Completing Tasks Correctly
sustaining lean concepts
Economic stride along with environmental impacts
demand
Rising operating and material cost.
Globalization
Becoming more efficient; eliminating waste
GLOBAL COMPETITION & THE DOLLAR
Global competition and lack of skilled labor
Quality of Employees
Economic downturn
Skilled workers
Desire for the whole supply chain to work on continuous improvement be it North America, China, E. Europe--still too many organizations that want to do business like they did it last year.
Economy
global competition
compete with larger companies
sustaining a qualified workforce
Remaining profitable
PRICING
The economy
economy
Technology improvements
Economy
Staying in business in poor economy
economy
Lack of knowledge
remaining competitive
economy
people
economic slowdown, and focus on short term financial markets rather than long term steady growth
Lean, Common Practices
talent management
economy
cost
outsourcing
Government. Unions,
economy
China
shortage of skilled labor
Poor Economy
global competition
off shoring of jobs due to higher labor costs in the US
Breaking down old culture habits
Skilled Employees
Government regulations and cost to administer them
People managing departments for which they aren't qualified to hold an entry level position.
outsourcing
Too many programs not enough focus on basics
Global Competition
imports
Greed / Narcissistic Leadership
economy
Unionization
Competition from Offshore Suppliers
Competing with foreign companies who do not have to pay for employee benefits and the economic situation.
Promoting manufacturing careers
offshoring
Cost
labor cost
funding for transportation projects
implication of financial crises
The economy
outsourcing
Favorable margins
controlling costs and maintaining leadership in business sector
China
The economy
decline of manufacturing base
Keep manufacturing in the USA
Getting young people to see it is a good career path. Getting rid of the negative press about "Manufacturing is dead" in this country.
Effects of ROHS on reliability
Finding qualified engineers and skilled workers
cost
Energy and (expected) carbon costs
Making your deadlines
The trust issue between management and labor
Economy
Economic downturn
Economic conditions
continuous training, improvement, communication. actionable reports. economy.
domestic manufacturing costs
The economic conditions
economical situation
offshore competition
Economy
Common belief that U.S. is NOT competitive which is wrong.
Global manufacturing pressure from competition
Salary verses output
The shrinking of manufacturing in the U.S.
Competing in world
economy and finding/making skilled workers
job losses, the de-industrialization of the U.S., Wall Street crisis
regulations
experienced & skilled workforce
Demand
Housing
New Sales
tough economy, offshoring, access to capital
Liquidity
Jobs
Keeping the work here in an affordable way
Top Line Revenue - input costs
retaining jobs
CEOs that "get it"
cost
Global competition driving lower cost
Lack of qualified people willing to work for $12-$17 per hour
being competitive
Unregulated foreign competition
The market
Becoming more customer focused
less printing, and faster machines
trade policy
Finding quality people to work in shop
Finding qualified people
Dedicated workers
increasing cost of raw materials
Finding more ways to improve efficiency and reduce waste
Keeping a good share of the market
Lower cost of employees in other countries
finding competent people
Economy and willing workforce. Unions must change or be discontinued.
skilled workforce
skilled labor
public opinion and short term LCC sourcing decisions
Cost
Becoming a lean company
Workforce development
costs
economy
keeping jobs in U.S.
Global competition
Management realizing that skilled talent is not being developed to continue the current and future specialized technologies.
Energy and transportation cost
costs
people
the economy
Outsourcing
Cost competitiveness with Asia
Business climate changes
skilled labor with proper attitude
Maintaining the supply base to provide competitive sourcing options
cutting costs in today's economy
environmental regulations
economy
The economy
offshoring technology
Unpredictability of the economy
current economic pressures
People
Remaining competitive in a global market
offshore sourcing
Competing and staying in business
economy
reputation as a career
retail credit
Supply of expert/trained factory workers
staying competitive
Lean manufacturing
attitude
training
imports
productivity
outsourcing
keeping efficiency high and costs low
quality
lack of sales
finding skilled employees.
staying competitive
India, China and Mexico
cost
Workers with adequate shop floor skills; pay scale doesn't support a family
work load
Management
Improving efficiency
Cost of manufacturing
global competition
Global competition
Innovation
profitability & economic conditions
adequate work force
global and domestic policies
Successfully adjusting to the slow down
Education
loss of business
outsourcing jobs
Lack of lean suppliers/union entitlements
economy
Government regulation, EPA, FDA, etc.
uncertain market due to the economy
export of jobs creating import of goods
raw material costs
constant improvement
Continuous improvement
Maintaining long-term focus
global competition
Economy
Economy
Making manufacturing in the U.S. competitive with the rest of the world.
Manpower and corporate grid
Skilled people
High cost of raw materials and services
Skilled labor
Quality and Innovation
Staying afloat in rough economical times
Competition with china
development of leaders
Customers
Economic downturn and offshore outsourcing
foreign competition
down economy
Recession
controlling cost to remain competitive in global market
Economic conditions caused by banking industry
sales
tax base
Capital investment
reduced sales
automation and overseas competition
maintaining cost effectiveness and viability amid foreign competition
no young people!!!!!!!!
workers losing their identity
quality employees
Outsourcing
relevance
dependable employees
Changing generational culture
Finding and hiring good talent
Economy
cost control
rapidly fluctuating costs and employee education
Economy's impact on consumers
The economy
The economy - housing market is way down
competition from overseas
Lean transformation / adopting lean
Total economy
labor relations
Cost control
recognition
Sales
Slow economy
Global economy
cost control
Changing price of raw materials
staffing
Finding good employees and keeping work in the U.S.
Maintaining business
Recessed economy
cost control
Economic problems
Training employees
Lack of spending by the general public
raw material costs and labor
Foreign competition
Offshore suppliers
china market
Displacement of jobs beyond the American borders
survival
skilled labor
Cost reduction
Aging facilities but greater production demands.
Customer, products
Jobs
Increasing cost of maintaining benefits, complying with government regulations and corporate taxes
Outsourcing of work
Unfair trade practices
our struggling economy
Stagnant economy
qualified help
taxes, growth of government & regulations
Competition from China
Work ethics
outsourcing to overseas
Market pricing
offshore competition, inadequate training in USA, credit
identifying value added activities
cash and profitability to remain competitive
Increasing costs, reduced margins
Oversees manufacturing
Cost
Losing manufacturing in the USA
Economic conditions
environmental concerns
global outsourcing
China
competitiveness
Economy
Keeping up with technology
Economic conditions
The future of American manufacturing against other countries.
Business growth
foreign countries
Outsourcing to lower labor countries
loss of jobs to overseas
Job loss
Quality personnel
Keeping equipment running
Cost of doing business in U.S.
the economy
staying in manufacturing
economic uncertainty
responding to changes in product mix
loss of jobs and imports
recession
us based suppliers
locating, attracting, retaining good people
Sales & cost management
staying competitive
lack of skilled work force
Labor
Customer service
Becoming lean and staying lean
guessing the estimated cost of goods, raw materials
Global economic downturn, leveraging new technology
Keeping industry in the U.S.
Foreign competition
competition and union demands
LCC pressure
foreign competition
skilled labor
Constant change
cost competitiveness in current economy
changing to slow
obtaining qualified workers
foreign competition
Good help
technical skill
Quality of people
Recession
Qualified/skilled manpower resources
meeting consumption demands reductions
The housing market!!!
Finding skilled workers
cost of labor
Understanding what the end-user want. Typically, insufficient information is passed on.
Regulation
the U.S. economy and national credit mismanagement
Diminishing sources of supply
poor economy
cost of domestic production
Skilled employees
costs
finding qualified employees
outsourcing
lack of skilled workers
Long term stability
Continuous significant cost improvement
Energy costs
slow economy
Hiring qualified employees with good attitudes.
economy
Location
skilled worker shortages
Demographic challenge (age) - youth is not interested in manufacturing; especially maintenance
Labor pool
politics
people
outsourcing
efficiency
Cost of materials
economy
Talent
competitors and keeping cost down
talent
Yield improvements
Energy and environment
financial crisis
outsourcing
Creating and protecting value-added intellectual property in a global environment
Staying in business with this economic downturn.
skilled workers
skilled labor
Economy
Government interference
Energy costs
economy
Investing in new technology
preservation of profitability
lost consumer buying interest
foreign competition
increasing our worth
Sales in bad economy
labor skills
Keeping work in the U.S.
recession
Deploying lean across a global supply chain
Suppliers' "supply chain"
competitive pricing with imports
Outsourcing
offshore manufacturing
Unfair trade
Hiring qualified, motivated people
The economy and offshoring
China
Economic slowdown
energy costs
Adapting to short term economic conditions without jeopardizing the mid to long term strategy.
economy
government meddling
Global demand
The economy
Staying in business!
global competition
global competition on a non-level playing field
outsourcing
Commodity pricing
Employee benefits & economic conditions
Economy
Maximizing the complete supply chain (internal and external)
technical skills of workforce
cost
automation and communication
Overseas competition
educated manpower and engineers with field experience
Skilled workers
unions and unskilled workers
economy
global competition
Staying alive
speed
finding capable machinists
Decreased demand for U.S. products
Tight credit market
Overhead costs
reducing costs
job security
Global competition
Production costs vs. cheap foreign competition.
outsourcing
new inventions
value added efficiency against forge in competition
Being competitive in the global market.
Recognizing the impact of the global market
supply chain
Offshore competition
Global competition
Cost and competition
recession
Finding technically educated people that want to work in a shop environment
Making product cheaper without being cheap
cheaper wages off shore
Maintaining jobs in the U.S.
Sourcing in global economies
Time management
unions
Eliminating waste - reducing throughput time
Funding
Everything is going overseas
Reluctant ownership
Transfer of operations to low cost regions
The recession
Exporting jobs overseas
Volatile commodity markets
Training and hiring of new employees
credit
The reduction in consumer confidence in today's economy.
Government: Fair international playing field
Keeping prices down
Competing in the global market
Getting and keeping qualified workers
Outsourcing/economy
escalating costs of salaries and raw materials
Cost control
Raw material costs and economic conditions of U.S.
Finding qualified employees
Global competition
economy
competition from China & economic crisis
Outsourcing
high cost, reduced demand
cost
operating cost
Continuing dismantling of the U.S. manufacturing base
Economy
response to slowdown in growth in world economy
International competition, economy, slow to pay
Cost pressures
Government regulation
Global competition
Finding qualified workers
keeping costs down
Ability to change quickly
Economy
imports; overall economy
foreign competition
Credit
the overall economy
current world economy
Economy
cost cuts
Continuous workflow
Lack of skilled labor
Decreased consumer spending
Staying competitive with low labor costs outside U.S.
raw material costs
lack of credit for working and development capital
cost increases, benefits, freight, materials
Cost control
Finding skilled people
Economy
skill of manpower
Raw material costs
Material cost
Worldwide overcapacity
Global competiveness
Cost of healthcare
Economy and finding skilled help.
innovation and speed to market
current economic downturn
production cost
Business and job moving overseas
work
imports, and automobiles not made in the USA.
Economic conditions
Cost reductions
China
competition
Current economic crisis - significant drop in demand
Economy
compete with worldwide producers
competitiveness
affordable product and keeping jobs
Credit/funding
economy
offshore competition
Competitive pressures and economic conditions
overseas competition
The economic climate
Foreign competition, economy
technical experience people
Qualified people
competitive environment
Cost control
Diversity of repair and overhaul work in the aviation arena.
Union labor issues
quality employees
Cost of manufacturing
Experienced workforce
economy
Availability of capital
Overseas competition
work force that will work without carrots
Raw materials costs
Other country competition
keeping plants in the USA
Marketing
outsourcing
Utility costs in the Northeast, unfair trade practices
Material price volatility
unqualified management
sales
Economic downturn
U.S. competitiveness
Qualified personnel
Failure of management to adapt quickly to changing markets
on time delivery with low inventory.
instability of all industries
Bringing more commercial work
Skilled labor
Foreign purchasing; if competitor leaves the states the only way to stay competitive is to follow
too much outsourcing
Cost
Becoming lean
economy and raw material pricing
Being able to adapt to drastically changing economic environment
keep pricing manageable
globalization
Low cost country labor rates
Continue to improve regularly
people
outsourcing to other countries
Globalization
Democrats
money
economy
Realization that manufacturing builds economies
loss of jobs
Hiring good people
keeping competitive by introducing new products
outsourcing
Leadership
globalization
Staying cost competitive.
Economic conditions: poor retail, raw materials prices
Management wanting to do more with less
U.S. economy
unions
Trying to maintain a profit while meeting customer demand
The economic collapse
Outsourcing
Profit margin erosion and revenue growth.
Finding projects
creating private sector jobs in the U.S.
cyclical work load
Material and equipment cost increases
economy
Adopting a lean culture
Supply chain Issues
The current economic slowdown
Raw materials
Finding competent people
Economy
raw materials price increases
Using more environmentally friendly methods for production.
correctly identifying value of investments (capital, personnel, development)
recession caused by credit crunch
Economy
time
economy
sales
Slowing economy
Keeping up with legislation
Getting young people involved
Asian product copying
downturn in economy
General economic downturn and panic
Fluctuation of cost in raw materials and transportation
Rising costs
new customers
economy
Economy - our business is discretionary
Focusing on long term and growth
Economy
personal
quality help
Lack of work ethic, unions and younger employees
Loss of jobs
The cconomy
Economy
recession
bad economic times
The uncertain defense budget
The effects the economy is having
economy
outsourcing still
outsourcing
Continually improving productivity
new product development
globalization
outsourcing
Obama being in bed with unions.
Remaining competitive in a global environment
international competition
Meeting increasing customer demands with fewer resources.
A declining market
retaining talent
parts obsolescence
Health insurance
Offshore competition
Materials costs
The economy
Stable economy
poor perception, legislation which makes other countries more attractive
Good craftsmen
offshore competition
Bean counters looking for short term results
Made in USA goods
Remaining competitive
Retirement of experienced workers
Being competitive in the market place and healthcare costs
H1 salaries undercutting U.S. hires
economy
in America they are NAFTA and GATT
resources vs. salaries
Business costs
The economy
Finding competent employees
Unrealistic expectations
Costs of doing business in the U.S.
recession/depression
The economy
Lack of talent & job skills
globalization
Technology erosion of product base
low cost competitors
Costs of doing business
foreign competition
Rising costs
Big Business
Government regulations
overseas competition
Loss of jobs to overseas
unstable economy
the reversal and loss of "employee involvement," task forces, etc.
Lack of lean programs
Demand for U.S. manufacturing processes
Quality
being able to compete with foreign trade
Slow economy
Economy
jobs leaving the U.S.
poor upper management
mass customization
Organizational behavior & Peter Principle
Ability to focus on total cost
Job competition
Turning the customer's ideas into products faster and cost efficiently
the global economic conditions
economic downturn
Believing in the possibility of a competitive future
sluggish economy
digging holes
The economy
qualified labor
Skilled people
The economy
finding the right people
too much outsourcing
offshore companies
foreign competition
foreign competition
outsourcing jobs overseas
government stupidity
keeping up with technology
reduced demand
level playing field
quality demands - zero defect
people that want to work to support themselves
Economic conditions
poor economy
The economy
lower inventories with increase productivity
Total cost management
Keeping manufacturing in the United States
Finding technically qualified/competent employment candidates
Too many companies, such as mine, that are foreign owned and really have no loyalty to the American worker. They are strictly looking at the bottom line and if there is some other country where the product can be made for less money then that is where they are headed.
China
Corporate greed - no consideration for employees
The economy
economy
Lack of confidence
outsourcing and imports from China
Downturn in economy
Workers who care about the success of manufacturing and believing in the spirit of continuous improvement
Cost reduction initiatives
Outsourcing
supply & demand
reliability of equipment
global competition
global competition
Succession planning -- management & technical
unions stranglehold
Cost of materials
Economic slowdown
Unionism
Foreign competition
Foreign competition
Maintaining global competitiveness
cheap foreign labor
Imports
economic
price increases, fuel surcharges
downturn
global economic volatility
being cost competitive on a global scale
State of the global economy
credit crunch

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