Survey: Majority of Firms Prohibit Social Networking on the Job

Workers who want to share the latest news with Facebook friends and Twitter followers will need to wait until after hours or risk violating company policy, a new survey suggests.

More than half (54%) of chief information officers (CIOs) interviewed recently said their firms do not allow employees to visit social networking sites for any reason while at work.

The survey was developed by Robert Half Technology, a Menlo Park, Calif.-based provider of information technology (IT) professionals on a project and full-time basis, and conducted by an independent research firm. It was based on telephone interviews with more than 1,400 CIOs from companies across the United States with 100 or more employees.

"Using social networking sites may divert employees' attention away from more pressing priorities, so it's understandable that some companies limit access," said Dave Willmer, executive director of Robert Half Technology. "For some professions, however, these sites can be leveraged as effective business tools, which may be why about one in five companies allows their use for work-related purposes."

Willmer cautioned that employees should always exercise good judgment, no matter how lenient their company's policy. "Professionals should let common sense prevail when using Facebook and similar siteseven outside of business hours," he said. "Regrettable posts can be a career liability."

Robert Half Technology offers the following tips for protecting your professional reputation when using social networking sites:

  • Know what's allowed. Make sure you understand and adhere to your company's social networking policy.
  • Use caution. Be familiar with each site's privacy settings to ensure personal details or photos you post can be viewed only by people you choose.
  • Keep it professional. Use social networking sites while at work to make connections with others in your field or follow industry newsnot to catch up with family or friends.
  • Stay positive. Avoid complaining about your manager and co-workers. Once you've hit submit or send, you can't always take back your wordsand there's a chance they could be read by the very people you're criticizing.
  • Polish your image. Tweet or blog about a topic related to your profession. You'll build a reputation as a subject-matter expert, which could help you advance in your career.
  • Monitor yourself. Even if your employer has a liberal policy about social networking, limit the time you spend checking your Facebook page or reading other people's tweets to avoid a productivity drain.

Interested in information related to this topic? Subscribe to our Information Technology eNewsletter.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish