Boeing Expands Flight Training Program Boeing Co.

Boeing Expands Flight Training Program

"Continued development of a robust global training network is vital, not just for Boeing, but for the industry," said Bob Bellitto, global Sales director of Boeing Flight Services.  

Driven by demand – and anticipated demand – for new aviation personnel, Boeing is expanding its flight training offerings.

The company on April 16 announced plans during the World Aviation Training Symposium in Orlando to up its flight training support for the Next-Generation 737, 777 and 787 Dreamliners.   

Boeing Flight Services will install two new full-flight simulators – a 777 and Next-Generation 737 – at its Singapore training campus by mid-2014 because of the increasing number of airplane deliveries – and the subsequent need for new pilots – in the Asia Pacific region. That’s partially because Singapore-based SilkAir recently signed a five-year training agreement with Boeing (IW 500/16) to convert the airline’s fleet to Boeing 737s.  

"Continued development of a robust global training network is vital, not just for Boeing, but for the industry," said Bob Bellitto, global Sales director of Boeing Flight Services.  

"The urgent need for competent aviation personnel is a global issue, but it's hitting the Asia Pacific region particularly hard. These new and strategically redeployed flight training devices are part of Boeing's ongoing commitment to meet the growing needs of the industry and our customers around the world."    

Earlier this year, Boeing also installed a second new 787 full-flight simulator at its London Gatwick campus, and relocated two 787 simulators to the Flight Services campus in Miami, which will be available for training purposes by this summer.   

Boeing’s 2012 Pilot and Technician Outlook called for the need for 460,000 new commercial airline pilots and 601,000 new maintenance technicians in the next 20 years.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish