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There are several internationally recognized frameworks that have been trying to help organizations address the range of risks they face both in their day-to-day activities, as well as those strategic and previously unimaginable things.

Re: "Sustainability in the Supply Chain It's More than Just Being Green'"

The article fails to point out that there are several internationally recognized frameworks that have been trying to help organizations address the range of risks they face both in their day-to-day activities, as well as those strategic and previously unimaginable things that might just bite them.

In spite of the recent focus from Sarbanes Oxley on financial control effectiveness, there are versions of the COSO risk-management model, which address the management of risks across the breadth of an enterprise's operations and organization. More recently there is ISO 31000, the risk management standard that focuses on the enterprise-wide management of risks, and ISO 26000 the Corporate Responsibility Standard, which provides a framework for managing corporate responsibility risks -- including in the supply chain.

However, the beauty of both COSO and ISO 31000 is that they provide a common-sense, proven approach to managing any sort of risks; ISO 26000 provides a little more guidance over corporate responsibility in the way that BS 25999 provides guidance for Business Continuity risk management.

The challenge is that responsibility is placed on the directors of an organization to identify their own risks and, no matter, which consultants are used to support the exercise, the risks identified and focused on will always be those of the organization.

And the people stakeholders should hold accountable when things go unexpectedly more wrong than had been considered are the directors.

The frameworks do provide, however, something against which directors can demonstrate having attempted to do it right.' -- Kings

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