Boeing Places Final Beam on New Facility in South Carolina

Boeing Places Final Beam on New Facility in South Carolina

Facility will manufacture interior parts for the 787 Dreamliner.

Boeing last week marked progress on its newest 787 Dreamliner interiors-fabrication facility, in North Charleston, S.C., with a ceremony commemorating placement of the last steel beam on the building.

The beam, signed by hundreds of construction workers and Boeing employees, was hoisted into place as a ceremonial tree was placed atop the building. The tree, to be planted on Boeing property, signifies good luck, prosperity and safety to building occupants.

Workers place the final beam on Boeing's new interior-fabrication facility in North Charleston, S.C. The facility is scheduled to open in fourth-quarter 2011.
"This is an exciting day for Fabrication as it puts us one step closer to producing innovative 787 interiors for the South Carolina final assembly and delivery team," said Lane Ballard, director Interiors Responsibility Center. "We are also pleased to honor the construction workers who have worked so diligently on this project, and are responsible for the progress thus far."

The 300,000-square-foot facility, located in the Palmetto Commerce Park in North Charleston, is about 10 miles from the Boeing South Carolina site. The proximity of the two facilities will help improve the efficiency of the final assembly and delivery process in South Carolina, Boeing said.

The Interior Responsibility Center South Carolina team will manufacture 787 interior parts at the new facility, including stowbins; closets, partitions; class dividers; floor-mounted stowbins used by flight attendants; overhead flight-crew rests; overhead flight-attendant crew rests; video-control stations; and attendant modules.

Construction began on the new fabrication facility in September 2010 and will continue through the fourth quarter of 2011, when it is scheduled to open.


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