GE Expansion to Bring 250 Manufacturing Jobs to Ellisville, Miss.

New facility needed to meet growing global demand for aircraft engines and systems.

GE Aviation said it will open a new manufacturing facility in Ellisville, Miss., to meet growing global demand for aircraft engines and systems.

The company will invest $56 million in the new facility, which it hopes to have online in 2013.

GE said the expansion "will create 250 new high-tech manufacturing jobs by 2016."

The 300,000-square foot facility will manufacture advanced composite components for aircraft engines and systems for GE Aviation's growing business, the company said.

The announcement follows the 2008 opening of GE Aviation's manufacturing facility in Batesville, Miss., which employs 300 workers and is growing.

"GE has invested more than $12 billion in the research and development of reliable technology innovation over the past 10 years and [this] announcement shows that commitment is paying off," said David Joyce, president and CEO of GE Aviation.

Over the next several years, GE said it will invest hundreds of millions of dollars across GE Aviation's more than 30 operations in the United States, including at new manufacturing operations in Auburn, Ala., and in Mississippi.

GE Aviation employs approximately 17,000 workers in manufacturing in the United States.

GE noted that deliveries of commercial engines for the company and its partners are approaching record levels.

In 2011, deliveries of commercial engines produced by GE Aviation and GE joint ventures CFM International and the Engine Alliance will grow approximately 10% over 2010 deliveries of 2,000 engines, according to the company.

Combined with GE's military engines, total engine deliveries in 2011 for GE Aviation and its partner companies are expected to reach 3,200 engines, according to GE.

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