Telematics Finding a Place in Operations

Telematics Finding a Place in Operations

Communications technology playing an increased role in monitoring process systems, says wireless communications exec.

In recent years, telematics has become a concept closely associated with the automotive industry, as a technology that combines personal communications, safety and security, entertainment, information systems, computing and wireless data.

But according to Emad Isaac, chief technology officer of wireless communications manufacturer Morey Corp., telematics will play an increasingly vital role in addressing manufacturing control issues for operations, services and maintenance processes.

Q: What role will we see telematics play in manufacturing processes?

Isaac: Telematics in the manufacturing industry are more geared toward predictive functions, such as preventive maintenance, or machine-to-machine applications, like increasing process efficiencies. It can also be used to manage inventory flow. Telematics can be used to not only determine position, like you see with a GPS, but also notify trends in performance.

Q: What advances are you seeing in telematics technology that is driving it into new applications?

Emad Isaac, chief technology officer, Morey Corp.

Isaac: I see telematics as a fusion of various technologies with different lifecycles. The focus has been on rugged, smaller, faster, more feature-rich and energy-efficient systems. The technology is moving toward tighter integration. More subcomponentry is being multipurposed to achieve cost and space reduction.

Q: Have you seen a trend toward using telematics for environmental initiatives?

Isaac: Absolutely. As more smart devices enter the market, you're going to see them used for reporting purposes to remotely monitor systems. Monitoring the 'greenness' of plants and facilities will become both a means to manage and identify efficiency opportunities. Telematics might not take over the world this year, but already you're seeing it in wider use. And that's only going to grow.

See Also

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish