COPENHAGEN -- In Copenhagen's central station, thousands of Swedes step off the train each morning to head for jobs that many say they could not be found on the Swedish side of the border.

Although the workers come from different backgrounds -- many are from the immigrant-heavy city of Malmoe -- they agree on one thing: getting hired in Denmark is easier than in Sweden.

"Here you could just talk to the employers to see if they were hiring. In Sweden it seemed like you needed more contacts to find a job," said Denny Crona, a 25 year-old sales clerk in the Copenhagen airport who has been making the 30-minute commute for more than four years.

The Danish model of mixing flexibility for employers, who can hire and fire personnel easily, with social security for workers, was credited with virtually eradicating unemployment in the Nordic nation, before the financial crisis hit.

The system differs markedly from those in neighboring Sweden and Germany, where terminating an employee is often expensive and cumbersome.

If workers who lose their jobs receive generous benefits and are offered courses and training schemes that help them improve their skills, they will be less inclined to demand a high level of job security, the Danish argument goes.