Discuss this Gallery 5

on Mar 13, 2015

One huge problem I see here. Try being one of those in the third tier and moving up into one of the top two tiers. I know, I know, "get an education". Sure, that would be great if the workers in the bottom tier could. What about all of those great workers who got fresh out of high school in the mid-90s era when manufacturing jobs were plentiful and all signs pointed toward long-term growth in wages that never materialized? Now those workers are stuck without any good options. They can't afford to eat and go to college on those paltry wages, and they can't get away from those paltry wages without college. Approximately 20 years into their careers and all of that knowledge and experience are going to waste. The solution is to get manufacturers to take responsibility for the education of their workforce again.

on Mar 13, 2015

That is a false assumption that manufacturers do not and will not invest i nemployee training. Most do offer a variety of tuition reimbursement programs. There are government training programs for displaced workers as well. It just takes motivation and drive

on Mar 14, 2015

Hi Steven,
I'm posting a link to an article that might be of interest:
http://www.davinciinstitute.com/papers/the-future-of-colleges-universiti...
Some the ideas mentioned in the article are already happening but probably a bit too slow for some of the workers who could benefit most from them.
Another good article on the subject was recently published in The Chronicle of Higher Education, http://chronicle.com/article/College-la-Carte/228307/?cid=wc However it is available only to paid subscribers but it talks about much the same thing.
There are some good things happening that will make it possible for someone to continue their education without being required to attend a bricks and mortar location and one example is the course from Edx about sensors and robotics. It even has some simple laboratory exercises and the total cost can be as low as $50.00 for a course that lasts about 15 weeks. No, it doesn't come with accreditation, but that too is being reviewed and my guess is that there will be a process in place for that quite soon.
An online education entity called Coursera is working with Georgia Sate U. and AT&T to provide online coursework.

on Mar 13, 2015

$25- up to near $50/hr for some legacy employees at auto manufacturers are a main reason why part supplier wages are as little as minimum wage where they work harder than the lazy UAW slobs at the auto makers. The REALITY is that UNSKILLED assembly line labor is worth no more than $15/hr MAXIMUM with an average wage of around $11-12 /hr. This is where the LIBERAL FANTASY comes in that every job in America should pay enough to support a family of 4 or 5 on one wage-earner. Minimum wage was NEVER meant to be that. Yet anytime there is discussion of min wage, the automatic liberal response is HOW can you support a large family on that? YOU CANT. SO DONT TRY. Its just a thinly veiled attempt at true socialism

on Mar 14, 2015

All three of you are correct. But, the assumption that there are only few tiers in manufacturing pay, and its one or the other, is wrong. There are not only many manufacturing companies that not only pay for skills, but pay for their employees to train for those skills. Thus a skill tier can become inserted in between worker and engineer. A college education is not necessary.

Both employees and employers benefit from this as more skills are learned and deployed, each employee and employers becomes more valuable to each other. Some food for thought.

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