US Hikes Mileage Standards for Cars Trucks

US Hikes Mileage Standards for Cars, Trucks

President Barack Obama said the new fuel economy standards "represent the single most important step we've ever taken to reduce our dependence on foreign oil."

The Obama administration issued fuel economy rules Tuesday that require the new cars and trucks in 2025 to average nearly double the fuel mileage of 2012 model vehicles.

President Barack Obama said the new fuel economy standards "represent the single most important step we've ever taken to reduce our dependence on foreign oil."

The rules will increase fuel economy to an average of 54.5 miles per gallon for cars and light-duty trucks by model year 2025.

In 2011, the standard was an average 27.3 miles per gallon.

"The standards will nearly double the fuel efficiency of those vehicles compared to new vehicles currently on our roads," the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said.

Combined with previous standards set by the Obama administration, the moves will save consumers more than $1.7 trillion in gasoline costs and reduce U.S. oil consumption by 12 billion barrels, the administration said.

Proposed by Obama in July 2011, the final rules for the 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards were developed by the NHTSA and the Environmental Protection Agency.

The process included consultations that included automakers, the United Auto Workers union, states, consumer groups and environmental and energy experts.

Last year, 13 major automakers -- which combined account for more than 90% of all vehicles sold in the U.S. -- announced their support for the new standards.

"This historic agreement builds on the progress we've already made to save families money at the pump and cut our oil consumption," Obama said.

Officials said the standards were a key component of the administration's energy policy, and would bring the nation over halfway to Obama's goal of reducing oil imports by a third by 2025.

The program builds on initiatives unveiled in May 2009 that were aimed at both increasing gas mileage and decreasing greenhouse gas pollution for new cars and trucks -- the first such policy at the national level.

The new efficiency standards would push automakers to develop new engine technologies and provide incentives for alternative-energy vehicles, such as electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids.

The combined CAFE standards will cut greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light trucks in half by 2025, the administration said.

Over the life of the program, emissions will be reduced by six billion metric tons, more than the total amount of carbon dioxide emitted by the United States in 2010.

The United Auto Workers said the new rules were a win-win for consumers and the auto industry.

"These new standards will help propel the auto industry forward by giving American families long-term relief from volatile fuel prices," Bob King, UAW president, said in a statement. "Lowering the total cost of driving will make automobiles more affordable and expand the market for new vehicles."

Copyright Agence France-Presse, 2012

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