Intel to Build $300 Million R&D Facility at its Arizona Site

Intel to Build $300 Million R&D Facility at its Arizona Site

Intel Corp. said it will build a new $300 million R&D facility at its semiconductor-manufacturing campus in Chandler, Ariz. The new facility will support the expansion of Intel's packaging operations. Intel said it expects construction to be completed in the second half of 2013. 

Intel Corp. (IW 500/26) said it will build a new $300 million R&D facility at its semiconductor-manufacturing campus in Chandler, Ariz.

The new facility will support the expansion of Intel's packaging operations, the company said in a news release.

Site preparation for the two-story, 285,000-square-foot R&D facility began in June. Intel said it expects construction to be completed in the second half of 2013.  

"This significant investment in R&D reflects Intel's principal role in defining the future of technology," said Babak Sabi, Intel vice president and director, assembly and test technology development.

The building is designed to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards, the company noted.

The new R&D facility will create several hundred jobs, with hiring set to take place over the next 18 months.  

Intel noted that about half of the positions will be filled by individuals with advanced-engineering degrees.

"Other positions are open to candidates with technical degrees and relevant experience," the company said in a news release. "Military veterans with technical training are often well-suited for a variety of roles within the company and Intel will specifically recruit veterans for these positions."

In February 2011, Intel unveiled plans to build a third semiconductor-manufacturing facility on the Chandler campus.

When completed in 2013, the $5 billion factory -- known as Fab 42 -- "will be the most advanced, high-volume semiconductor manufacturing facility in the world," according to Intel.

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