Angelina Sujata US Congress members introduce Vehicle Safety Improvement Act Chip Somodevilla, Getty Images

Angelina Sujata, second from left, who was injured by a defective Takata airbag, and U.S. Congress members introduce the Vehicle Safety Improvement Act earlier this month in Washington, D.C.

Honda Reports Another Death Related to Exploding Airbags

A September 2014 death in California marks the eighth confirmed casualty linked to the ongoing crisis for Takata, whose airbags have fired metal shrapnel inside vehicles.

TOKYO — Japanese automaker Honda confirmed a new death linked to an exploding air bag crisis on Monday — bringing the global total to eight fatalities — that has sparked the recall of millions of vehicles.

The company said a woman in Los Angeles died in September last year after the faulty inflator in a 2001 Honda Civic ruptured, firing metal shrapnel at her.

“The airbag inflator rupture that occurred during this crash resulted in the death of the driver, Ms. Jewel Brangman,” the company said in a statement. “Honda has communicated information collected to date about this crash to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.”

The announcement marks the latest chapter in a snowballing crisis for Tokyo-based airbag supplier Takata, which agreed last month to double a U.S. recall to a record of nearly 34 million vehicles made by some of the world’s larger automakers.

The defect — thought to be linked to a chemical propellant that helps inflate the airbags — can cause them to deploy with explosive force, sending metal shrapnel hurtling toward drivers and passengers.

Honda, which has appointed a new president to help it navigate the crisis, is the most heavily affected. Toyota, Ford, General Motors, Nissan and BMW have all also been forced to recall vehicles.

A senior Takata executive told U.S. lawmakers this month that the company, one of the world’s larger airbag makers, was still searching for the main cause of the deadly explosions.

Copyright Agence France-Presse, 2015

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