Canada flag Copyright Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Canada to Retaliate Against US Over Country-of-origin Labeling

Monday's appeal victory in the quarrel, which pitted Canada and Mexico against the United States, marked a final decision "without the possibility of further appeal," said Ed Fast, Canada's minister of international trade.

OTTAWA - Canada will pursue retaliatory trade measures against the United States over what it says are discriminatory labeling practices, following a win Monday before the World Trade Organization.

The dispute centers on a U.S. regulation in place since 2009 which requires that certain product labels must include an item's country of origin.

Canada, which said that the measure adversely affects its pig and cattle breeders, successfully challenged the regulation before the WTO.

America's largest trade partner had previously fought the so-called COOL (country-of-origin labeling) rule at the WTO, saying it discriminated against Canadian products, and won. 

But Washington tweaked the regulation to circumvent the ruling.

Monday's appeal victory in the quarrel, which pitted Canada and Mexico against the United States, marked a final decision "without the possibility of further appeal," said Ed Fast, Canada's minister of international trade.

The WTO reaffirmed "Canada's long-standing position that these measures are blatantly protectionist and discriminate against Canada," Fast added.

"In light of the final ruling, and due to the fact that the United States has continued to discriminate against Canadian livestock products, Canada will be seeking authority from the WTO to use retaliatory measures on U.S. agricultural and non-agricultural products," he said.

Canada could slap duties on a multitude of US goods that range from fruits and chocolates to cereal, jewelry and wooden furniture. 

"Our government stands on the side of Canadian farmers and ranchers, and we will continue to protect all hardworking Canadians throughout this retaliatory process," Fast said.

Copyright Agence France-Presse, 2015

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish