Aeroflot Grounds Nearly Half of its Superjets

Aeroflot Grounds Nearly Half of its Superjets

"The four Sukhoi Superjet 100 planes will resume commercial flights by the end of February. At the current time work on them is being finished. The first two could resume flying by the end of this week," said Sukhoi Civil Aviation, which makes the plane along with international partners. 

MOSCOW — Aeroflot has grounded four out of its 10-strong fleet of Russian-made Sukhoi Superjets due to technical problems, the manufacturer said Tuesday.

Sukhoi Civil Aviation, which makes the plane along with international partners, said that all the planes would be resuming flights by the end of the month at the very latest.

The grounding of almost half of Aeroflot's fleet of Superjets represents a new setback for hopes that the plane, the first to be made by post-Soviet Russia, would rapidly become a standard choice for short haul flights.

"The four Sukhoi Superjet 100 planes will resume commercial flights by the end of February. At the current time work on them is being finished. The first two could resume flying by the end of this week," Sukhoi said in a statement.

According to the Vedomosti daily, the Russian aviation agency Rosaviatsia had informed Aeroflot on Monday that the four planes' authorization to fly was being withdrawn.

The Superjet has had technical incidents with its landing gear and leak detection systems since it started flying in 2011. However, the company insists that relatively minor technical issues are a common problem on a brand new plane design.

According to Russia's Kommersant daily, the Superjet last year was responsible for 40% of technical problems needing repair at Aeroflot last year even though the plane accounts for only 8% of its fleet.

Attempts to market the plane are still shadowed by the deadly accident in May last year when a Superjet performing at an Indonesian air show slammed into a volcano killing all 45 on board.

Indonesian investigators have blamed pilot error for the crash.

Copyright Agence France-Presse, 2013

TAGS: The Economy
Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish