Tracking the Skies After MH370

Tracking the Skies After MH370

While systems exist that can track aircraft and automatically transmit flight-data recorder information, few are used by operators looking for ROI. More on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370

Aviation Week examines in its piece "MH370 Mystery Points To Need For Better Aircraft Tracking" how the aerospace industry is falling short when it comes to data tracking.

"The story of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 reads like bad fiction -- a perfectly safe aircraft disappears from radar on a scheduled flight, and the extensive international search-and-rescue effort that ensues finds few clues," write Sean Broderick, Jens Flottau, Guy Norris and Adrian Schofield of Aviation Week.

"It is not fiction, but it should be in light of the technology to monitor aircraft and the massive amounts of operational data available."

While systems exist that can track aircraft and automatically transmit flight-data recorder information, few are used by operators.

 “Nobody is going to purchase those services without a business case and a return on investment,” Matt Bradley, president of Flyht, which provides flight-data streaming on about 300 aircraft flown by 45 operators, tells Aviation Week.


Read more about aircraft tracking at Aviation Week.

Aviation Week is an IndustryWeek companion site within Penton, a professional information services company.

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