Samsung wordmark at CES 2015 David Becker, Getty Images

Samsung Signs 'Final Settlement' with Cancer Victims

After long fighting claims of semiconductor plant workers contracting cancer, Samsung signs its self-proclaimed final settlement. One advocacy group, though, says some work still remains.

SEOUL — Samsung Electronics announced Tuesday that it had signed “a final settlement” over workers who contracted cancer in its semiconductor plants, but a victims’ advocacy group said key issues remained unresolved.

The deal, signed by the South Korean electronics giant and two groups representing the victims and their families, aims to improve health and safety conditions at all of Samsung’s plants.

The parties agreed to establish an independent committee to conduct “a thorough inspection of Samsung’s facilities and release reports on any areas for improvement,” the company said in a statement.

Lawyers for the victims said 244 employees at Samsung’s chip and display plants developed rare diseases linked to hazardous conditions, with 87 of them dying.

Samsung fought the claims for years but issued an apology in May 2014, then set up a compensation fund last year. In its statement on Tuesday, the company thanked the mediation committee for its dedication to “making this final settlement possible.” 

“In the big picture, it is correct to say everything has now been settled,” a Samsung official told AFP. “But Samsung remains open to talks as the agreements are put into practice.”

However, Banolim — one of the groups representing the victims — said the matter was still far from closed, arguing that Samsung’s apology and its fund had never been fully approved by all the victims’ families.

“Samsung has refused to discuss the issues of apology and compensation with us,” Kwon Young-Eun, a member of the group, told AFP. “We will continue to demand Samsung address these issues properly.”

Samsung said it has already provided financial compensation for more than 100 out of 150 applicants to its fund.

Copyright Agence France-Presse, 2016

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