Alcoa Expands Titanium Aerospace Components Acquires TITAL

Alcoa Expands Titanium Aerospace Components, Acquires TITAL

Dec. 15, 2014
Alcoa  projects a compounded annual commercial jet growth rate of 7% through 2019 and sees a current 9-year production order book at 2013 delivery rates.

In a move to strengthen its global position to capture increasing demand for advanced jet engine components made of titanium, Alcoa (IW 500/53) will acquire Germany-based TITAL.

TITAL is a leader in titanium and aluminum structural castings for aircraft engines and airframes. Almost 70% of TITAL’s revenues are expected to come from commercial aerospace sales in 2019. In 2013, the company generated revenues of approximately $96 million, more than half of which came from titanium products.

“This acquisition is the next step in building a powerful aerospace growth engine,” said Klaus Kleinfeld, Alcoa CEO. “As a fast-growing innovator, TITAL will increase our share of highly differentiated content on the world’s best-selling jet engines. “

Alcoa  projects a compounded annual commercial jet growth rate of 7% through 2019 and sees a current 9-year production order book at 2013 delivery rates.

The acquisition will establish titanium casting capabilities in Europe for Alcoa, while expanding its aluminum casting capacity. TITAL’s strong connections to European engine and aircraft manufacturers such as Airbus, SNECMA, and Rolls-Royce, will enhance Alcoa’s customer relationships in the region, and beyond.

TITAL’s engineers are known and highly respected experts in manufacturing advanced, single-piece components, often delivered ready for the customer to install, which lower weight and reduce complexity. These products, such as engine gearboxes, nacelles and fan frames, are used on current and next-generation jet engines and airframes. TITAL will add capabilities in casting titanium airframe structures, such as titanium castings for pylons. Pylons mount engines onto airframes and are a highly-engineered part because they must bear the load of the engine and its thrust.

In addition, TITAL is a leader in process technology. It employs advanced techniques needed to manage titanium’s reactive properties, including cold hearth melting and centrifugal and gravity casting. Its teams also use 3D-printed prototypes, enabling customers to test designs and bring a finished product to market faster.

About the Author

Adrienne Selko | Senior Editor

Focus: Workforce, Talent 

Follow Me on Twitter: @ASelkoIW

Bio: Adrienne Selko has written about many topics over the 17 years she has been with the publication and currently focuses on workforce development strategies. Previously Adrienne was in corporate communications at a medical manufacturing company as well as a large regional bank. She is the author of Do I Have to Wear Garlic Around My Neck? which made the Cleveland Plain Dealer's best sellers list. She is also a senior editor at Material Handling & Logistics and EHS Today

Editorial mission statement: Manufacturing is the enviable position of creating products, processes and policies that solve the world’s problems. When the industry stepped up to manufacture what was necessary to combat the pandemic, it revealed its true nature. My goal is to showcase the sector’s ability to address a broad range of workforce issues including technology, training, diversity & inclusion, with a goal of enticing future generations to join this amazing sector.

Why I find manufacturing interesting: On my first day working for a company that made medical equipment such as MRIs, I toured the plant floor. On every wall was a photo of a person, mostly children. I asked my supervisor why this was the case and he said that the work we do at this company has saved these people’s lives. “We never forget how important our work is and everyone’s contribution to that.” From that moment on I was hooked on manufacturing.

I have talked with many people in this field who have transformed their own career development to assist others. For example, companies are hiring those with disabilities, those previously incarcerated and other talent pools that have been underutilized. I have talked with leaders who have brought out the best in their workforce, as well as employees doing their best work while doing good for the world. 

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