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Forget Google Glass, Here Comes iContacts

As someone who's had (and has written about) Google Glass for five months now, as well as some of the new and similar products coming out (like these ski goggles) I'm obviously a fan of "heads up" displays -- and not just because I see people on the streets of NYC every day crashing into each other while they look at their phones.

However, a new vision-based enabling technology I just read about on Yanko Design's site lives on an entire different level -- in this case, seated on the very surface of your eyes. Consisting of a "contact lens mouse" and "signal receiver/lens storage" unit, the product was initially developed by Eun-Gyeong Gwon and Eun-Jae Lee for people with disabilities but obviously today's tech-obsessed consumer culture would likely snap them up by the millions.

That said, I can still see/anticipate flaws -- for instance, having blinks stand in for mouse clicks. As a longtime information worker (who uses this awesome 3M-designed ergonomic mouse both for reasons of carpal tunnel avoidance and powerpoint acceleration) I can only imagine the result that repetitive strain injury might take on my face. Also, as the writer Long Tran points out, how is it powered and what's the battery life? I currently have five mobile technologies (iPhone 4 and 5, Samsung Galaxy, AT&T mobile hotspot and Google Glass) and bought into the Duracell PowerMat system just to keep from losing my mind from cascading mobile battery failure.  

The geek in me loves iContacts - the guy who works 16 hours a day in front of multiple screens is a skeptic (for the moment at least).

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