Ford Invests $155 Million in Fuel-Efficient Engines

Adds jobs with Cleveland Plant No. 1 upgrade

Ford Motor Co. announced on Feb. 26 that it is investing $155 million and adding 60 jobs at its Cleveland operations to build a new fuel-efficient V-6 engine for the 2011 Mustang, which has expected class-leading highway fuel efficiency of 30 miles per gallon on the highway and 305 horsepower.

The investment and jobs at Ford's Cleveland Engine Plant No. 1 brings the company's investment in powertrain engineering and facility upgrades in North America to $1.8 billion to support its 2011 vehicle launches -- with more to come, the company says. The total number of jobs being added as part of these investments is 1,260.

Specifically, the $121 million for the manufacturing facility supports continued investment in developing and re-tooling the plant's flexible manufacturing systems in the assembly and component (cylinder block, head and crankshaft) areas.

"The Cleveland Engine Plant is not only building fuel-efficient engines for some of our most popular Ford products, it's becoming a hub for the future of Ford powertrains," Russo said. "This facility has the flexibility and the expertise to help us meet customer demands for fun, fuel-efficient vehicles, and it represents the future of advanced manufacturing in North America."

Ford's investment at Cleveland Engine Plant is supported by Ford's green partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy. This Ohio plant is one of 11 Ford facilities in the U.S. participating in the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentives Program initiated by Congress and implemented by the Obama administration. The program is helping to develop advanced technology vehicles and strengthen American manufacturing across the country. This project is also supported by Ford's state and local government partners primarily through training funds.

In 2004, Ford invested $350 million into the plant for redesign and installation of an all-new assembly line as well as block, crankshaft and cylinder head machining lines. The plant also led the way in 2009 with the introduction of Ford's first EcoBoost engines, which use gasoline turbocharged direct-injection technology for up to 20 percent better fuel economy, 15 percent fewer CO2 emissions and superior driving performance versus larger displacement engines.

The investment represents the latest in Ford's ongoing commitment to the Cleveland Engine Plant No. 1. Opened in 1951 as Ford's first engine plant in Ohio, the facility has produced more than 35 million engines.

In 2004, Ford invested $350 million into the plant for redesign and installation of an all-new assembly line as well as block, crankshaft and cylinder head machining lines. The plant also led the way in 2009 with the introduction of Ford's first EcoBoost engines, which use gasoline turbocharged direct-injection technology for up to 20% better fuel economy, 15% fewer CO2 emissions and superior driving performance versus larger displacement engines.

The new Mustang engine is one of nine new or upgraded engines or transmissions for 2011 model Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles.

"Ford is absolutely committed to delivering class-leading fuel efficiency with every new vehicle we introduce, and this investment in Cleveland provides further proof," said Bill Russo, director of manufacturing for Ford's powertrain operations.

The 2011 Ford Mustang, on sale this spring, has an all-aluminum dual-overhead cam (DOHC), 3.7-liter Duratec 24-valve V-6 engine and is expected to delivers 30 mpg on the highway.

Also available for the 2011-model year are the Mustang GT -- with an all-new 5.0-liter V-8 delivering 412 horsepower and projected unsurpassed highway mileage of 25 mpg -- and a no-compromises Shelby GT500 powered by a 5.4-liter supercharged V-8 and 550 horsepower.

The new 3.7-liter V-6 is built at Ford's Cleveland Engine Plant 1. The 5.0-liter V-8 engine is built at Ford's Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario. The 5.4-liter supercharged V-8 is built at Ford's Romeo, Mich., Engine Plant.

Additionally, Ford has lowered its tailpipe CO2 emissions more than any other automaker, the company says. Ford's fleet-wide average of 434 grams per mile is 37 grams lower than the 2007 total and 25 grams lower than 2008.

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