One of many lean tools employed by Goodyear in its innovation process is visual planning Every release and every learning cycle is planned on a visual planning board identified by a sticky note The planning is done according to available capacity and at a weekly cadence Any deviation from the plan is shown visibly and all problems are resolved in regular short huddles standup meetings with all the stakeholders Pictured here left to right are Goodyear associates Rachel Graves development engineer Juan Ferna

One of many lean tools employed by Goodyear in its innovation process is visual planning. Every release and every learning cycle is planned on a visual planning board, identified by a sticky note. The planning is done according to available capacity and at a weekly cadence. Any deviation from the plan is shown visibly, and all problems are resolved in regular short huddles (stand-up meetings) with all the stakeholders. Pictured here, left to right, are Goodyear associates Rachel Graves, development engineer; Juan Fernandez, senior development engineer; and John Paul Pinciotti, development engineer.

When It Comes to Product Development, There's No Time to Lose

Speed as a competitive advantage is a commonly quoted phrase, but how do you make it work? Google and Goodyear show you how.

In his new book, Lean-Driven Innovation: Powering Product Development at The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Norbert Majerus presents a brief history of product development at the global tire company.  It includes this passage:

"In Goodyear R&D, we had no criteria for accepting new work. A project could start as a result of a meeting with marketing, a request for new raw material approval by a supplier, or a function deciding to develop new

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