Ergonomics Standards Fate Tied To Spending Bill

Jan. 13, 2005
By Michael A. Verespej Keep an eye on the bill HR 4577, which the House has passed. It authorizes nearly $340 billion in spending for education, labor and health programs in fiscal 2001. But it also contains an amendment that would block the OSHA from ...
ByMichael A. Verespej Keep an eye on the bill HR 4577, which the House has passed. It authorizes nearly $340 billion in spending for education, labor and health programs in fiscal 2001. But it also contains an amendment that would block the OSHA from issuing its highly controversial ergonomics regulation for a year. That puts the spotlight on the Clinton Administration, which is in favor of both the spending measure and a final rule from OSHA governing ergonomics in the workplace.

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