Green New Deal Could Cost Consumers $244 Billion in Appliance Replacements Says Energy Group Alex Wong, Getty Images

Manufacturing Advocacy Group Says Green New Deal Could Cost Consumers $244 Billion in Replacement Costs

"The Green New Deal should be vigorously opposed by any political leader who has even a cursory understanding of the U.S. economy and sensible policies that would be designed to improve our environment and meet our growing energy needs," said David Holt, president of the Consumer Energy Alliance.

The Consumer Energy Alliance, an advocate for energy, representing small businesses, distributors, producers and manufacturers to support environmentally sustainable energy, has weighed in on the proposed Green New Deal. and isn't too happy with it. 

On Feb. 14, its president, David Holt, issued the following statement:

The Green New Deal is not a practical solution for American consumers.

Many common household appliances including furnaces, water heaters, stoves and dryers are powered by abundant, affordable energy resources including natural gas, which the proposal aims to eliminate.

Just considering the collective costs of replacing these daily household devices would cost American families nearly $244 billion!”

The costs to replace these appliances required by the Green New Deal would be an insurmountable burden for the 39.7 million Americans living at or below the poverty line and the 61% of Americans that have less than $1,000 in their savings account.

This segment of the population lacks the financial resources to replace the most essential appliances the Green New Deal would require. American consumers need better, more practical energy solutions than this proposal offers.

The Green New Deal should be vigorously opposed by any political leader who has even a cursory understanding of the U.S. economy and sensible policies that would be designed to improve our environment and meet our growing energy needs.

TAGS: Environment
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