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Baxter Starts Construction of Biologics Manufacturing Plant in Georgia

Aug. 1, 2012
Company will invest $1 billion will and hire 1,500.

Georgia’s life sciences industry just got bigger as Baxter International (IW 1000/309) broke ground on Wednesday for its new manufacturing facility.

With an investment that will exceed $1 billion, the facility, located near Atlanta, will employ 1,500 people.

“Today we begin the work to construct a new state-of-the-art biotechnology facility. In a few years, Baxter team members working in facilities located on the ground where we are standing today will produce lifesaving biologic treatments for patients around the world,” said Robert L. Parkinson, CEO of Baxter International at the groundbreaking ceremony.

Last April Baxter announced its plans to build a facility in Georgia that will manufacture plasma-based therapies that treat chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The company will also locate warehouse and plasma testing laboratory facilities at the Stanton Springs site.

In addition, Stanton Springs will also be home to a biotech training center that will provide a workforce pipeline for Baxter and other members of the state’s bioscience industry. The training center will be owned by the state and operated by Georgia Quick Start the top-ranked customized workforce training program in the country. 

Construction will begin in 2013, with completion of the first manufacturing buildings  planned for 2015. Additional construction will continue into 2016 and the plant is anticipated to begin commercial production in 2018.

The state’s biosciences industry, plus the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have a $23 billion annual economic impact on Georgia and employ more than 105,000 people, according to statistics from the 2011 “Shaping Infinity” report, released by Georgia BIO.

The sector created $19.5 billion in output and contributed $7.5 billion to the state GDP as well as $496 million in tax revenues for state and local governments.

Georgia’s bioscience industry cluster includes more than 320 multinational firms, consisting of many small- and medium-sized companies that include the full scope of the bioscience sector.

The state also supports public-private partnerships in bioscience, including the Georgia Research Alliance, through which the state’s six research universities collaborate with businesses to create, improve and grow science- and technology-based companies.

About the Author

Adrienne Selko | Senior Editor

Focus: Workforce, Talent 

Follow Me on Twitter: @ASelkoIW

Bio: Adrienne Selko has written about many topics over the 17 years she has been with the publication and currently focuses on workforce development strategies. Previously Adrienne was in corporate communications at a medical manufacturing company as well as a large regional bank. She is the author of Do I Have to Wear Garlic Around My Neck? which made the Cleveland Plain Dealer's best sellers list. She is also a senior editor at Material Handling & Logistics and EHS Today

Editorial mission statement: Manufacturing is the enviable position of creating products, processes and policies that solve the world’s problems. When the industry stepped up to manufacture what was necessary to combat the pandemic, it revealed its true nature. My goal is to showcase the sector’s ability to address a broad range of workforce issues including technology, training, diversity & inclusion, with a goal of enticing future generations to join this amazing sector.

Why I find manufacturing interesting: On my first day working for a company that made medical equipment such as MRIs, I toured the plant floor. On every wall was a photo of a person, mostly children. I asked my supervisor why this was the case and he said that the work we do at this company has saved these people’s lives. “We never forget how important our work is and everyone’s contribution to that.” From that moment on I was hooked on manufacturing.

I have talked with many people in this field who have transformed their own career development to assist others. For example, companies are hiring those with disabilities, those previously incarcerated and other talent pools that have been underutilized. I have talked with leaders who have brought out the best in their workforce, as well as employees doing their best work while doing good for the world. 

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