Stephen Brashear, Getty Images
Industryweek 25027 101117 Boeing 737max9 Airplane Stephenbrashear2

Boeing Ordered to Replace 737 Wing Parts Prone to Cracking

June 3, 2019
Manufacturer discovered issue and reported it to the FAA.

Airlines worldwide must inspect 312 of Boeing Co.’s 737 family of aircraft, including some of the grounded 737 Max, because they have wing components that are prone to cracking and must be repaired within 10 days, U.S. aviation regulators said Sunday.

Boeing informed the Federal Aviation Administration that so-called leading edge slat tracks may not have been properly manufactured and pose a safety risk, the agency said in an emailed statement. The parts allow the wing to expand to create more lift during takeoff and landing.

While less critical than the global grounding of its 737 Max since March, Boeing’s latest production issue adds another headache for a management team trying control the fallout from two deadly crashes and get the U.S. manufacturer’s top-selling plane flying again. The head of the International Air Transport Association warned airline CEOs at the industry’s annual gathering this past weekend that the plane-approval process is damaged and the industry is under scrutiny.

The FAA plans to issue an order calling for operators of 737 planes worldwide to identify whether the deficient parts were installed and to replace them, if needed. A complete failure wouldn’t lead to a loss of the aircraft, the FAA said, but could cause damage during flight.

Boeing has notified operators of the planes about the needed repairs and is sending replacement parts to help minimize the time aircraft are out of service, the company said in a statement. The slat tracks in question were made by a supplier to Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc., Boeing said in an email.

Boeing has identified 148 parts made by a subcontractor that are affected. The parts may be on a total of 179 737 Max aircraft and 133 737 NG planes worldwide, including 33 Max and 32 NG aircraft in the U.S., the FAA said.

The NG, or Next Generation, 737s are a predecessor to the Max family.

The deficient parts may be on fewer of the identified planes, Boeing said. While the full number of jets must be inspected, 20 Max and 21 NG aircraft are “most likely” to have the suspect parts installed, according to the company.

The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since March 13 after two fatal crashes tied to a malfunction that caused a flight control system to repeatedly drive down the plane’s nose. Boeing is finalizing a software fix along with proposed new training that will be required before the planes fly again.

By Alan Levin

Popular Sponsored Recommendations

Beware Extreme Software

Sept. 24, 2023
As a manufacturer, you understand the importance of staying ahead of the curve and being proactive in your approach to technology. With the rapid pace of change in the industry...

Disruptive EV Technologies Are Driving New Supplier Realities

Sept. 20, 2023
Vehicle electrification is upending the automotive landscape, forcing suppliers to make critical strategic and operational decisions. Understand what that means for you in our...

Future-Proofing Your Business with Smart Manufacturing

Jan. 2, 2024
An IndustryWeek-Plant Services-Smart Industry-Automation World-hosted webinar sponsored by Amazon Web Services

Four Keys To Operational Excellence

Sept. 20, 2023
As manufacturers face supply chain disruption and shrinking margins, increasing operations performance is critical. Our smart manufacturing guidebook can help you achieve the ...

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of IndustryWeek, create an account today!