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Industryweek 8152 Federal Reserve

Fed Remaining 'Patient' on Rate Hike

Jan. 28, 2015
The Federal Open Market Committee left unchanged the key federal funds rate near zero, where it has been pegged since late 2008.

WASHINGTON - The Federal Reserve on Wednesday said it would remain "patient" on raising ultra-low interest rates for the first time since 2006, saying the economy was growing at a "solid pace."

Wrapping up a two-day monetary policy meeting, the Federal Open Market Committee left unchanged the key federal funds rate near zero, where it has been pegged since late 2008, as widely expected.

Below is the full text of the Fed’s statement.

The Federal Reserve's policy arm, the Federal Open Market Committee, announced no changes to monetary policy Wednesday after a two-day meeting. Here is the text of the FOMC statement:

"Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in December suggests that economic activity has been expanding at a solid pace.  Labor market conditions have improved further, with strong job gains and a lower unemployment rate. On balance, a range of labor market indicators suggests that underutilization of labor resources continues to diminish. 

"However, if incoming information indicates faster progress toward the Committee’s employment and inflation objectives than the Committee now expects, then increases in the target range for the federal funds rate are likely to occur sooner than currently anticipated.  Conversely, if progress proves slower than expected, then increases in the target range are likely to occur later than currently anticipated.

"The Committee is maintaining its existing policy of reinvesting principal payments from its holdings of agency debt and agency mortgage-backed securities in agency mortgage-backed securities and of rolling over maturing Treasury securities at auction.  This policy, by keeping the Committee’s holdings of longer-term securities at sizable levels, should help maintain accommodative financial conditions.

"When the Committee decides to begin to remove policy accommodation, it will take a balanced approach consistent with its longer-run goals of maximum employment and inflation of 2%.  The Committee currently anticipates that, even after employment and inflation are near mandate-consistent levels, economic conditions may, for some time, warrant keeping the target federal funds rate below levels the Committee views as normal in the longer run.

"Voting for the FOMC monetary policy action were: Janet L. Yellen, Chair; William C. Dudley, Vice Chairman; Lael Brainard; Charles L. Evans; Stanley Fischer; Jeffrey M. Lacker; Dennis P. Lockhart; Jerome H. Powell; Daniel K. Tarullo; and John C. Williams."

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